Chinese Steamed Meat Buns (Baozi) 包子

by Yi on November 25, 2013 · 82 comments

Post image for Chinese Steamed Meat Buns (Baozi) 包子

This is Part II of the Steamed Bun Series. Here are the other posts in this series:
Part I: Mantou (Chinese Steamed Bun) 饅頭

Before today, I never thought I’d post a recipe for steamed meat buns. I just thought nobody would ever have the patience to make these buns at home until that a few weeks ago.

It all started when one of my friends texted me after seeing my Chinese steamed buns on my Instagram and telling me I should offer lessons on making these buns. Apparently she had just spent over $60 to learn how to make steamed meat buns from a local culinary school.

I was shocked by the fact that there were so many people interested in making the buns. The idea of teaching my steamed bun recipe and I even started seeing dollar signs…

Chinese Steamed Meat Buns (baozi) 包子

But in this season of giving, I decided to share the recipe on Yi Reservation. Good food is meant to be shared and a classic dish such as this deserved to be enjoyed and shared with the rest of the world. So here you have it, the step-by-step steamed bun recipe, at absolutely no charge!

This recipe is my Thanksgiving gift (for those of you who celebrate) to all my readers who have been supporting me over the years! And feel free to share the love with your friends and family who might also be interested in these meat buns!

So what are these steamed meat buns? For those who haven’t had, the Chinese meat buns, aka Baozi 包子, are steamed soft buns with all kinds of stuffing inside. In China, these buns are most commonly eaten as breakfast with congee or warm soy milk. This is sort of like answer to the bagel and coffee combination here in the States.

There are various ways of making these buns and there are countless variations in making preparing fillings from pork to seafood to vegan. Since I grew up eating the pork stuffed buns, the pork filling has always been my personal favorite and I can literally eat them anytime on any day.

So, that is a long-winded way of saying that you need to try these buns, and you need to try them today!

Chinese Steamed Meat Buns (baozi) 包子

If you live in the States, you should be able to find them in the frozen food section in many Asian grocery stores. Even better, you can now make them yourself at home following this MAN-PROOF step by step recipe. You’ll realize that it’s not that hard to make these delicious meat buns!!

And for those of you like visual learning, I have shared a video tutorial on how to make these steamed Chinese Meat Buns on Youtube. Please check it out!

P.S. Yi is switching to a new email subscription provider. If you have already subscribed to Yi Reservation, you will receive an opt-in email from me asking you to confirm the subscription. If you wish to continue to receive the email updates (and I hope you all do), please confirm the opt-in email =)

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Step by Step Illustration

Follow my basic steamed bun (Mantou) recipe to make the basic dough. You’ll need about 2 – 3 hours to prepare the dough

Chinese Steamed Meat Buns (baozi) 包子

While waiting for the dough to rise, start making the stuffing by chopping the scallions and ginger

Chinese Steamed Meat Buns (baozi) 包子

Chop the cabbage to the size of ½ of your pinky nail. Move the chopped cabbage to a mixing bowl

Chinese Steamed Meat Buns (baozi) 包子

Mix 1 tbsp of salt into the cabbage. Let sit for about 20 minutes or until cabbage has released some moisture

Chinese Steamed Meat Buns (baozi) 包子

Remove the cabbage liquid. Combine with the ground pork (or your meat of choice) in the same bowl. Add the chopped scallions and ginger to the pork and cabbage

Chinese Steamed Meat Buns (baozi) 包子

Mix in all the stuffing marinade ingredients to the pork except the cooking oil. Whisk the stuffing using a spoon until all the ingredients are well incorporated. Add additional salt to taste if needed

Chinese Steamed Meat Buns (baozi) 包子

Drip the cooking oil in the meat mixture and whisk to mix. Seal the stuffing with plastic wrapper and chill in the fridge for at least 30 minutes. This can be done in advance

Chinese Steamed Meat Buns (baozi) 包子

Once the dough is ready, transfer the dough to a flour-dusted workstation. Divide into 4 portions. Roll each portion into a log that’s about 1.5 inch in diameter

Chinese Steamed Meat Buns (baozi) 包子

Cut the log into 6 parts and shape each port into a ball. Make sure you coat the dough balls with a layer of flour. Press down the ball with your palm. Using a rolling pin, roll the dough into a round thin wrapper with 4 inch diameter. When rolling, make sure the center of the wrapper is thicker than the edge of the wrapper. Repeat this step to make a batch of 6 wrappers at a time

Chinese Steamed Meat Buns (baozi) 包子

To fold the bun. Place 1 to 2 tbsp of the filling in the center of the wrapper. Try to stack up the filling so it’s at least 1 inch from the edge of the wrapper. Wrap the bun by folding the edge counterclockwise until the bun is completely sealed. Repeat these two steps to assemble the rest of the buns

Chinese Steamed Meat Buns (baozi) 包子

Place the buns on a bamboo steamer with parchment in between to prevent sticking. Don’t steam your buns right away but instead let them sit for another 30 – 45 minutes. This is an important step in making the buns soft and fluffy. The buns will rise in size

Chinese Steamed Meat Buns (baozi) 包子

Steam the buns for 15 minutes over high heat. Turn off the heat but do not open the steamer cover. Let them sit in the steamer for another 5 minutes before you take them out

Chinese Steamed Meat Buns (baozi) 包子

Let them cool a little and serve hot as breakfast, snack, or appetizers

Chinese Steamed Meat Buns (Baozi)

Prep Time: 3 hours

Cook Time: 30 minutes

Total Time: 3 hours, 30 minutes

Yield: 21 - 24 Buns

Make these homemade Chinese Steamed Meat Buns following this MAN-PROOF step-by-step recipe at www.yireservation.com.

Ingredients

    For the dough
  • 500g all-purpose flour, more as needed
  • 1.5tsp instant yeast
  • 50ml lukewarm water
  • 230ml milk or water +/- 10ml, at room temperature
  • 1tsp baking powder
  • 50g sugar
  • 3g salt
  • 2tbsp cooking oil
  • 1/10tsp baking soda (optional)
  • For stuffing
  • 1.5lb ground pork (can use chicken, beef, or lamb)
  • ¼ cabbage
  • 5 scallions
  • 2inch fresh ginger root
  • Stuffing Marinade
  • 2tbsp soy sauce
  • 2tbsp cooking oil
  • 1tbsp sugar
  • 1.5tbsp Chinese rice wine
  • 1tsp five-spice powder
  • 1 egg
  • 1tsp sesame oil
  • 2tsp ground white pepper
  • Additional salt to taste

Instructions

  1. Follow my basic steamed bun (Mantou) recipe to make the basic dough. You’ll need about 2 – 3 hours to prepare the dough
  2. While waiting for the dough to rise, start making the stuffing by chopping the scallions and ginger
  3. Chop the cabbage to the size of ½ of your pinky nail. Move the chopped cabbage to a mixing bowl
  4. Mix 1 tbsp of salt into the cabbage. Let sit for about 20 minutes or until cabbage has released some moisture
  5. Remove the cabbage liquid. Combine with the ground pork (or your meat of choice) in the same bowl. Add the chopped scallions and ginger to the pork and cabbage
  6. Mix in all the stuffing marinade ingredients to the pork except the cooking oil. Whisk the stuffing using a spoon until all the ingredients are well incorporated. Add additional salt to taste if needed
  7. Drip the cooking oil in the meat mixture and whisk to mix. Seal the stuffing with plastic wrapper and chill in the fridge for at least 30 minutes. This can be done in advance
  8. Once the dough is ready, transfer the dough to a flour-dusted workstation. Divide into 4 portions. Roll each portion into a log that’s about 1.5 inch in diameter
  9. Cut the log into 6 parts and shape each port into a ball. Make sure you coat the dough balls with a layer of flour. Press down the ball with your palm. Using a rolling pin, roll the dough into a round thin wrapper with 4 inch diameter. When rolling, make sure the center of the wrapper is thicker than the edge of the wrapper. Repeat this step to make a batch of 6 wrappers at a time
  10. To fold the bun. Place 1 to 2 tbsp of the filling in the center of the wrapper. Try to stack up the filling so it’s at least 1 inch from the edge of the wrapper. Wrap the bun by folding the edge counterclockwise until the bun is completely sealed. Repeat these two steps to assemble the rest of the buns
  11. Place the buns on a bamboo steamer with parchment in between to prevent sticking. Don’t steam your buns right away but instead let them sit for another 30 – 45 minutes. This is an important step in making the buns soft and fluffy. The buns will rise in size
  12. Steam the buns for 15 minutes over high heat. Turn off the heat but do not open the steamer cover. Let them sit in the steamer for another 5 minutes before you take them out. Let them cool a little and serve hot as breakfast, snack, or appetizers
http://yireservation.com/recipes/chinese-steamed-meat-buns/

Chinese Steamed Meat Buns (baozi) 包子

{ 75 comments… read them below or add one }

1 Sarah December 6, 2014 at 1:20 pm

Hi, I already tried your recipe last week and it was delicious. The only problem is that after a while the buns got a little bit hard. I was wondering how to conserve them ? Do you wrap paper film around it ? Can I just put them in a tupperware ?
I’m making around 80 for a bake and sell on Monday and I’m not sure how to keep them fresh….
Thank you

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2 Yi December 7, 2014 at 7:48 pm

Hi Sorry, sorry for getting back to you late. If you made these buns over the weekend they should still be good by Monday. If you plan to reheat them by steaming, they should turn soft again and just cover the buns with a damped (paper) towel. If you plan to microwave them, do it with damped paper towel as well. I hope this is not too late. Thanks for checking out my recipe!

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3 Sarah December 8, 2014 at 2:43 am

Hi, you have perfect timing ! We start seeling them at 12:00, so now I know how to reheat them thank you !!

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4 Yi December 8, 2014 at 9:38 pm

Great to hear that everything worked out for you!

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5 Nancy June 19, 2014 at 7:55 am

Hi Yi,

I tried making the baozi last night. My pork was very dry, do you know what would cause the pork to be dry? Thanks.

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6 Yi June 24, 2014 at 10:12 pm

Hi Nancy, sorry for getting back to you late. There could be a few reasons causin the pork to come out dry. Do you use very lean pork? If that’s the case, I’d suggest blend the pork with maybe 10-20% fat. Another thing is when mixing the pork with the marinates, make sure you whisk it until you get a smooth paste-like consistence. If you have a hard time mixing the pork that means you need more liquid(egg, soy sauce, cooking wine, and etc.) in the pork stuffing. Also, increasing the amount of the cooking oil used in the pork can also make the pork stuffing juicier. I hope this answers your question. Please feel free to let me know if you have any other questions.

Yi

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7 sima May 26, 2014 at 8:44 pm

Yi,
Thank you for your recipe. I just tried to make steamed buns using a different recipe which called for only flour, water, sugar and yeast. When I learned from from my Chinese friend they turned out great with her dough recipe. However today my dough was dense and the buns deflated. I am going to try again with your recipe but do you have any tips? are the oil and baking powder absolutely a must?

Thank you!

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8 Yi May 28, 2014 at 10:31 pm

Hi Sima, just replied your other post on the steamed plain buns. To answer your questions here, you can skip both oil and baking powder if you don’t have them. The baking powder helps the bun come out fluffier and the oil makes the surface of the bun smooth. However you can still make good buns without these. The most important thing is to proof your yeast correctly (if using active dry yeast) and do a good kneading either by hand or using breadmachine/mixer. I hope you will give the recipe a try and please don’t hesitate to let me know if you have any other questions.

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9 sima May 29, 2014 at 12:23 pm

Thanks Yi,

I just made the dough again after your suggestions but my dough still isn’t rising. Not sure what I am doing wrong. I will keep trying till I figure it out.

Thanks!

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10 Yi May 29, 2014 at 9:19 pm

sorry to hear that. What kind of yeast are you using and how long did you let it rise? Thanks

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11 Amy @ Chew Out Loud May 14, 2014 at 12:39 am

OK, I found the steamed buns because I want to make them, and then now I landed on these meat buns!! I can’t stop salivating over all your awesome Chinese dishes, which are making me miss life back in CA, where we lived near SO many great Chinese restaurants! I’m totally planning to make this. Pinning it now. Thanks, Yi, and keep bringing us more authentic Chinese goodies :)

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12 Yi May 15, 2014 at 4:57 am

Hi Amy, thanks for visiting! I am so glad to hear that you enjoy Chinese food! Please let me know how the buns turn out! Thanks again!

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13 Stephanie May 9, 2014 at 3:55 pm

Hey Yi thank you for such a great tutorial! I’m new to chinese cooking and mine turned out really great! I used beef and wood ear mushrooms instead of pork and it was delicious!

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14 raven May 5, 2014 at 12:33 pm

Hi, if i want to make a lot for home freezing, do i freeze it raw or cooked? thanks~

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15 Yi May 5, 2014 at 9:44 pm

Hi there, I normally freeze the buns after I steam them. Thanks

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16 Leslie May 1, 2014 at 6:27 am

Hello Ying,

I finally got the courage to try making these Steamed Meat Buns. They were wonderful. I had no difficulty crimping the buns and they turned out to be delightful little pillows of savory goodness. I will make them for my monthly wine club party. Much appreciation for your fine tutorial and encouragement.

I made a dipping sauce of soy sauce, tiny bit of sesame oil, grated ginger, lime juice, orange juice, bit of rice wine vinegar, red pepper flakes, couple of tablespoons of dry white wine, and kumquat powder (I made from local kumquats dried in my dehydrator and ground in a spice blender). Kumquat powder enhances almost everything.
Thank you, Leslie

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17 Leslie May 1, 2014 at 6:22 am

Hello Ying,

I finally got the courage to try making these Steamed Meat Buns. They were wonderful. I had no difficulty crimping the buns and they turned out to be delightful little pillows of savory goodness. I will make them for my monthly wine club party. Much appreciation for your fine tutorial and encouragement.

Thank you, Leslie

Reply

18 PaTTaMoNE April 5, 2014 at 7:41 am

Hello there,

I have tried your recipe and it was soooooo gooooood.
I almost cried when I had my first bite.
It felt like home.
Thank you very much for sharing :)

Greetings from Finland :)

Reply

19 tram March 29, 2014 at 4:27 pm

Hi,

I made these buns yesterday- They are quite tasty;the dough is soft and light but the buns are not white like the ones in the photo. They are kind of beige color. I wonder why. I heard they sell special flour at Asian Markets just for making buns. Do you have any idea?

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20 Yi March 30, 2014 at 1:32 pm

Hi Tram, thanks for checking out my blog. Do you use un-bleached all purpose flour? If you want the buns come out white try to use bleached flour. I’ve not used the special bun flour but I know it’s designed for steamed buns. It’s made of bleached the low-gluten flour if I remember correctly. Please let me know if you have any other questions. Thanks.

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21 Jenny March 27, 2014 at 1:28 pm

Thanks for the instruction. I made the pork bun yesterday. However, I used self-raising flour as I couldn’t find all purpose flour here in my local shops in the UK, I only used half of the amount of baking powder and sugar recommended in your recipe. My husband and children doesn’t like cabbage I used courgette and caramelised onion instead. My children loved it. My husband doesn’t like the bun to be steamed so I had to slow fry a few for him (shui jian bao水煎包). He liked it very much.

Reply

22 Yi March 28, 2014 at 10:55 pm

Hello Jenny, thanks for your detailed feedback! I really like how you adapted the recipe to your own preferences! Thanks again for visiting my blog!

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23 Theola March 22, 2014 at 7:12 pm

I want to make these ahead of time for a party, how long can these sit out, and do they need to be kept warm?

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24 Yi March 22, 2014 at 7:57 pm

Hi there, yes you can make them ahead of time. They can stay in room temperature for about a day or you can keep in the fridge for up to 3 days. If you want to serve later for a party, just warm up in the steamer before serving! I hope this helps!

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25 Theola March 22, 2014 at 8:00 pm

Thank you so much this is very helpful! I can’t wait to try it !

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26 Yi March 22, 2014 at 8:02 pm

Thanks for checking out my recipe. Please let me know how the buns come out:)

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27 Angie March 11, 2014 at 5:19 pm

hi Yi,
Can I use other veg e.g chinese cabbage for this recipe?

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28 Yi March 11, 2014 at 5:48 pm

Hi Angie, yes you can absolutely make the filling vegetarian! My favorite vegetarian stuffing is shiitake mushroom with cabbage and some rice noodle but you can use any vegetables you prefer! Hope this answers your question!

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29 Angie March 12, 2014 at 3:34 pm

Thanks for the quick reply. I am planning to use chinese cabbage , shitake mushroom and mince turkey. Hopefully it will be a success :)

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30 Yi March 12, 2014 at 10:22 pm

you are welcome! please keep me posted on how your the buns come out :)

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31 Monika March 11, 2014 at 5:40 am

Hey, I was wondering can I add rice flour insed of all-purpose flour? Woul it turn out okay or is it better to use all-purpose flour? ;)

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32 Yi March 11, 2014 at 7:17 am

Hi Monika, thanks for checking out my blog. For this steamed bun, you’ll have to use all-purpose flour other other kinds of wheat flour (i.e. bread flour, whole-wheat flour). Rice flour, unfortunately will not produce the soft and fluffy buns like the ones here. I hope this helps and please let me know if you have any other questions.

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33 Monika March 11, 2014 at 10:10 am

Thanx for the answer it helps me a lot ;] and yes I have one more question can I add dried date-palm or dried apricots instead of meat? ;]

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34 Yi March 11, 2014 at 11:14 am

Hi Monika, yes you can use dried fruits for the filling. Normally I use them for sweet filling. If you want to make a savory vegetarian filling, you can sbustitute the meat wtih mushroom, or rice noodles, or even tofu. Please let me know if that answers your question. Thanks.

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35 Monika March 11, 2014 at 11:49 am

Yes it does, thanx, and one more question is it okey to use instant yeast and baking powder together? or should I use only baking powder?

36 Van Tha March 7, 2014 at 3:30 pm

Hey

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37 Yi March 7, 2014 at 11:47 pm

Hello Van Tha. Thanks for visiting my blog!

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38 Bonbon February 14, 2014 at 5:04 pm

Hi Yi, great recipe! Have a question, plz don’t roll your eyes and smirk. Can one make buns with store bought frozen bread biscuit doughs?–for a lazy girl version

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39 Yi February 14, 2014 at 5:53 pm

Hi Bonbon, yes you can absolutely use frozen biscuit dough for the steamed buns! It works surprisingly well. It’s my little secret weapon when I feel like being lazy:) please let me know if you have any other questions’

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40 Bonbon February 14, 2014 at 6:16 pm

Which one is better? Bread dough or biscuit? any brand for recommendation?

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41 Bonbon February 14, 2014 at 6:18 pm

oh by the way, you just made my day letting me know even a pro has lazy short cut sometime ;) thx bunch

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42 Yi February 14, 2014 at 6:36 pm

I personally like the instant biscuit dough in the can! it works every time!

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43 Deb February 1, 2014 at 11:49 pm

I made these tonight and they were very tasty. I ended up blending my own 5 spice powder using a recipe I found on line. It made my kitchen …well the whole house really smells like a spice store…wonderful! The meat buns smelled so good cooking too. My daughter kept asking when they were going to be done. Yi, I have a question tho… is the yeast amount correct in the dough recipe? 1 1/2 tablespoons for about 4 cups flour? this seems like a lot of yeast for that amount of flour. Other recipes I found for Mantou only called for 1 or 1 1/2 teaspoons. Just wondering.

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44 Yi February 2, 2014 at 6:19 pm

Hi Deb, thanks for the feedback. I love five spice powder that I make it my own using my coffee grinder as well. I appreciate for spotting the typo. Yes it was meant to be 1.5 tsp. Just updated the recipe. Thank you!

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45 Neal January 12, 2014 at 7:11 pm

Just tried it again.
1. I put the sugar in the water with the yeast. The yeast activated much better. I made all the water a bit warmer this time.
2. Made a filling from cooked pork belly and cabbage and also a vegeterrean filling.
3. Used organic sugar from costco.
4. Made vegeterrean baozi, meat baozi, and mantou.
5. Used a nice flour from “Trader Joes”.
6. Hand needed for about 15 minutes. Added a little more flour as the dough was a bit too sticky. Let it rise for about 3 hours.

Wow. Got a great result. I couldn’t figure out what the pretty green thing is on the top of your dumplings. Is it scallions?

Thanks again for your recipe.

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46 Yi January 12, 2014 at 10:51 pm

Thanks for your feedback Neal! It looks like you are having a steam bun feast these couple of days!! Yes the green thing on the meat buns is scallion.

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47 Nami | Just One Cookbook December 5, 2013 at 3:37 am

I really really want to make these someday. I am not sure if I’m more intimidated to try steamed buns or bread… All I need is practice and having a trustworthy good recipe like this one! Thank you so much for sharing this recipe. MUST try!

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48 Vivienne December 2, 2013 at 6:22 pm

Ahhhh Yi! You’ve really inspired me this morning to give this a go!! I’ve just came back from a trip to Taiwan and had SO much delicious baos….but now back here…I’m craving and craving for them!

Thanks so much for sharing your recipe :)

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49 Yi December 2, 2013 at 10:38 pm

Welcome back Vivienne. I am so jealous of your trip to Japan and Taiwan! I am sure you had some seriously delicious baos in Taiwan!

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50 Bam's Kitchen December 2, 2013 at 6:14 pm

Just gorgeous and thank you for this MAN PROOF recipe. Great step by step and tutorial. I love your skilled technique for your closure of the buns. One day, when life gets a little less crazy a video of you making these would be wonderful!. Are you preparing for the Chinese New Year? Wishing you a wonderful week. BAM

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51 Yi December 2, 2013 at 10:35 pm

Thank you Bam for the kind words. I’ll let you know when the video is up. Thanks.

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52 Lokness @ The Missing Lokness December 2, 2013 at 2:33 pm

These buns look amazing! I love that you decorate the buns with some green onions. Beautiful! I love Chinese baos. I definitely need to try these soon. Thanks for sharing. Hope you had a great thanksgiving!

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53 Yi December 2, 2013 at 10:34 pm

Hi Lokness, thank for stopping by my blog. I hope you get to make these buns soon!

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54 Juliana November 30, 2013 at 6:36 pm

Wow, these steamed buns look great, they sure look better than the ones that I see in the restaurants in the area. Nothing like freshly steamed buns…yum!
Hope you are enjoying your weekend :D

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55 Alex November 29, 2013 at 4:06 pm

Wow, so great looking!

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56 Yi November 30, 2013 at 12:03 am

Thanks for stoppig by Alex!

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57 Shannon | JustAsDelish November 27, 2013 at 11:24 am

I’ve never attempted making bao, you make it look so easy. Great job and your bao looks so delicious!

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58 Yi November 30, 2013 at 12:36 am

Hello Shannon, the buns might look hard to make but I think give a little practice everyone can make them

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59 wok with ray November 26, 2013 at 12:37 pm

The only reason why I don’t make this often is the time it takes to make them. I have the patience but my stomach don’t and it keeps saying “feed me now.” haha. Love the step by step instruction. Thank you Yi!

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60 Yi November 30, 2013 at 12:38 am

hi Ray, thanks for visiting. Yes I know exactly what you mean. I normally make extra buns and freeze them for the “feed me now” moments:)

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61 Purabi Naha | Cosmopolitan Currymania November 26, 2013 at 12:12 pm

Oh I ate Baozi zillion times when I was living in Hong Kong. And wow, these are so easy to make!! I am so happy that you shared this recipe with us. Thanks!! LOOKS DELICIOUS.

(Sorry for writing to you after a long time, although I do see all your facebook updates. Just can’t find time managing my two small kids!)

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62 Yi November 30, 2013 at 1:48 am

Hi Purabi, it’s great seeing you. I am glad that you loved these buns when you were in HK. Hope you get to make them sometimes!

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63 Lauren November 26, 2013 at 4:02 am

This filling looks so good! I learned to make Bao Zi in Beijing, but the recipe requires an oven (which I do not have) and I like the sound of this filling better!

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64 Yi December 1, 2013 at 1:02 am

Thanks Lauren! It’s interesting that you mentioned about the baked baozi. I wonder if that’s the bread version of this bun.

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65 Angie@Angie's Recipes November 25, 2013 at 11:24 pm

Exactly the way how I do the steamed pork buns. They look so delicious.

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66 Yi December 1, 2013 at 1:07 am

Hi Agnie, it’s great to hear that you make steamed buns at home as well. Do you have any favorite stuffing?

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67 tigerfish November 25, 2013 at 7:39 pm

How I wish I could make my own Baozi!
But the dough is a challenge for me, definitely.

Thanks for sharing.

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68 Yi December 1, 2013 at 1:08 am

I know exactly what you mean. it sounded really hard to me in the beginning but after a few trails and errors it became very manageable. Try it when you get a chance!

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69 Jeannie Tay November 25, 2013 at 7:32 pm

Hi Yi, Love your step by step instructions, and the way you folded in the bun dough…I can never achieve that result…pinned for future reference, and looking forward to watching your video too!

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70 Yi December 1, 2013 at 1:16 am

Hi Jeannie, thanks for leaving the comments. I’ll let you know once the video is up.

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71 DB November 25, 2013 at 3:32 pm

What about frozen round wonton skins? Can that be used instead.
How about adding a little crab meat, too?

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72 Yi November 26, 2013 at 9:25 pm

Hi DB, thanks for the comment. This is a very good question and I am so glad you asked. To make these buns, you’ll need leavened dough which is similar to the dough used for bread. Unfortunately wonton skins are not leavened so you’ll not get that soft and fluffy texture. Fortunately, there is an shortcut I can share. Go to your local grocery store and pick a canned ready-to-use biscuit dough. You can use that dough and follow the rest of the recipe. It would come out almost as good as homemade dough. I think this is going to be a frequently asked question so I’ll add this tip in my post. Thanks again for the excellent question and I hope this helps!

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73 John@Kitchen Riffs November 25, 2013 at 2:01 pm

I love steamed buns! I’ve never made them, but they’ve been on my list of stuff to make forever. You might just have given me the kick I need to try these myself. ;-) Good recipe – thanks. And thanks for the heads up re the email change. I do subscribe to you through email and appreciate the warning that I’ll need to look for an opt-in email.

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74 Yi December 1, 2013 at 1:20 am

Hi John, if you get to make this please let me know how it came out. Thanks.

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75 Yi March 11, 2014 at 5:51 pm

You will definitely need yeast to leaven the bread. The use of baking powder can be optional but it does make your bun fluffier!

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